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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
'm losing to this guy." playing michael dukakis. you really do have to go back to ronald reagan to find a republican that was in command during a presidential debate. and i predict that's going to excite the republican base in a way it hasn't been excited in a very long time. we're not used to winning debates like this. >> right. >> i'd even -- i think you're exactly right. and i'd push back even farther. he was better than nixon. and he was better than ford. so you could argue, except for president reagan, governor reagan then, it was, in fact, the strongest republican debate performance in the history of televised debates. the other thing that i find so interesting -- and joe, i wonder what you think about this -- is this was not a tea party message. one of the reasons perhaps governor romney did so well is that this might actually be the real governor romney at last. >> yep. >> and it was a very -- people could take me on on this, i would argue that was a mainstream conservative message that could have been largely unchanged except for the tales from 1980 forward. and that is somethi
and ronald reagan the second term as the productive term, the big achievement so it's hard to know whether the republican party will -- where they will push the blame if that happens, but the question is how they decide to spend the next four years and i think it's very hard to tell but there is some hope in looking back at both clinton and reagan. >> he was also a far right to limit took running the republican party at the time whoever they equivalent was a time and. but in fact he wasn't. life was a little more complicated by the fearful analogy. >> he raised taxes -- >> i think that's why the parties in opposition tend to be less responsible than parties of power. i think you probably agree. >> agree from your point of view i can think of the times when the other party the of irresponsibly in opposition and the question as it seems to me it from the is elected and you have the party that you think would be responsible and is in the position they have to govern and we will see what happens if that genuinely tends to pull the party is more towards the sector whenever someone becomes presi
theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> reporter: the next election, democratic candidate due can a ki dukakis is asked this question. >> if kity were raped and murdered, would you favor irrevocable death penalty for the killer? >> no, i don't. i think you know that i proposed the death penalty during all of my life. >> reporter: the public sees his answer as cold and dispassionate. that very night his poll numbers dropped. during the 1988 vice presidential debate -- >>
again. >> so who won? >> it's a ronald reagan win and really because he kept employing that disarming phrase there you go again. to carter he never really had an answer. he looked very awkward afterwards and that was obviously a pre-rehearsed line that reagan unleashed on carter to great effect. right now you see barack obama and mitt romney trying to find their version of their "you go again" hoping it could perhaps score some points. we're critiquing not just the speech but the body language and that little bit of interaction between the two men and there's a duel going on there that we try to decipher and phrases like that when they score are considered knock out punches. >> there was another moment of body language in 1980 when vice president al gore made an unusual move towards then governor george w. bush of texas. >> that's what the question in this campaign is about. it's not what your philosophy and your position on issues. but can you get things done. and i believe i can. >> what about the norwood bill? >> forgive me that was 2000. what did you make of that maneuver there?
or whether it was george w. bush or ronald reagan or bill clinton? do they approached these debates differently or do the american people view it differently when you have a sitting president? >> i think so, yes. one of the things that happens is the incumbent is at somewhat of a disadvantage being placed on an equal footing as the challenger, as we talked about before. incumbents have typically had a very rough time in the first debate. i am thinking back to jimmy carter in 1980. ronald reagan in 1984. george h. w. bush in '92. all of these guys who had been in the presidency, they got on that debate stage and came face- to-face with the challenger. it is rattling. they all had a very difficult time getting through the first debate. in each case, they had to up their game as the series went forward. >> you say, "the morning after >> you say, "the morning after the debate, will the media the
in the preparation to debate ronald reagan. >> we set up a couple of podiums. how closely do they try to stage everything in the debate. >> everything is negotiated and the whole one ups is how cold is the studio versus how warm and most importantly as i learned in 1984. is lighting. reagan people got the lighting set and mondale walks out . he has huge bagsurn his eyes. >> did they have a chance to check out the lighting. >> they did and they missed it. one of the things that you mention is just how far apart the podiums are. >> you can be further apart. and how do they engage and you are looking in the camera and have the moderator and critecal moments of campaign is how you turn. >> bill clinton used wag the platform. >> how do you advice. not to put your finger. it is a question of emphasis. and al gore did something risky and it back fired. he walked off his podium and invaded governor bush's speech. he was prepared for al gore to approach him. al gore had done that in the prevous primary. how close do they have to be prepared. you have to be comfortable and prepared for everything . so p
for ronald reagan the first time and then trickle-down economics nearly killed our family. i watched clinton fix the budget and change everything and it was great. then i watched it all go bad again. to the vice presidential candidates, i just feel that biden is thata hug and he makes his gaffes and you have to chuckle, nothing serious, but he always brings up his family and talks of his constituency. then you go to paul ryan. i have watched paul ryan on c- span for many years. i watched him come into power in the congress. he started out as a page. he pretty much was under the radar for many years, and around with a group of youngsters. then in the last few years he has teame, with his budget. everybody patted him on the back for doing something, including me, because he really had not done anything up until then. this constituency is not based on any big city in milwaukee, so he could pretty much say what he wanted and his constituency did not watch c-span. they did not really know the guy. but they know him now. warm hughere's no there. i'm in the age group where it will not affect me if
or ronald reagan or bill clinton? do they approached these debates differently or do the american people view it differently when you have a sitting president? >> i think so, yes. one of the things that happens is the incumbent is at somewhat of a disadvantage being placed on an equal footing as the challenger, as we talked about before. incumbents have typically had a very rough time in the first debate. i am thinking back to jimmy carter in 1980. ronald reagan in 1984. george h. w. bush in '92. all of these guys who had been in the presidency, they got on that debate stage and came face-to-face with the challenger. it is rattling. they all had a very difficult time getting through the first debate. in each case, they had to up their game as the series went forward. >> you say, "the morning after the debate, will the media the talking about knockout punches? who knows? a little boldness might make good politics." what do you mean? >> i mean this idea of not approaching this debate as an awful obstacle you have to get over but taking advantage of that opportunity. even for the guys like
to be there and are eager to make their case. bill clinton was like that. ronald reagan was like that. these two are not like that. for them, this is more, please do not let me do anything wrong, than, what can i do right? as was discussed earlier, he needs a dramatic moment to shift the momentum. if he is intimidated by the experience or feeling boxed in, he is less likely to do that. for obama, it is more a question for maintaining his lead. he does not want to do anything right now that reverses the trajectory he is on. i would expect he is a literate -- a little timid as well. >> if you look at past debates, one dealing with policy, the d, the with gerald forwar other is more style, where obama made a joke about his age. how much is policy and how much a style in these debates? >> i think probably my judgment would be a lot of the stylistic -- a lot of it is stylistic. it is the way they come across to the voters. it is not necessarily as much what they are saying as how they are saying it. every once in awhile, it is itchly more of a case of glti avoidance. to do with lot with their handler
. we cover elections, not economics generally, but ronald reagan was re-elected with a 7.2% because he said it was the morning in america. optimism was what he sold. he was able to say 7.2% is great news, great news. he got re-elected with 49 states. he lost minnesota and the district of columbia with 7.2%. what should obama get with 7.8%? it seems like it's within the range there and everybody is pooh-poohing it and, oh, geez. i know why jack welch is scared, that number is too damn close to reagan's number. >> i think how this works with the president's narrative is that we're moving in the right direction, don't change -- you know, don't change horses, don't go back to a playbook that demonstrably didn't work, the george bush supply side stuff that he can legitimately tie to mitt romney. he had a narrative that said the economy is moving in the right direction, and i think this job report actually strengthens that narrative. and much more than levels of variables like the level of the employment rate, it's momentum that i think forms voters' views on the economy. >> i think it was i
some similar positions. it is structurally sound. it will have to be tweaked the way was by ronald reagan and speaker -- democratic speaker tip o'neill. but the basic structure is sound. but i'm not to talk about the guy is behind social security and medicare, and then talk about medicare because that's the big driver of our deficits right now. you know, my grandmother -- some of you know -- helped to raise me. my grandparents did. my grandfather died a while back. my grandmother died three days before i was elected president. she was fiercely independent. she worked her way up, only a high-school education. she ended up being vice president of the local bank. she ended up living alone by choice. and the reason she to be independent was because of social security and medicare. she had worked all her life, put in this money, and understood there was a basic guarantee, a floor under which she could not go. that is the perspective i bring when i think about what's called entitlements. the name itself implies some sense of dependency on the part of these folks. these are folks who have
party. they've become so extreme says jeb bush that neither his father nor ronald reagan could get elected today in a republican primary. so let's throw the extremists out and get back to some good, sensible, moderate republicans who want to get things done. we'll talk about that and a whole lot more here on today's "full court press." here we get the latest from jacki schechner out in los angeles where she's got today's current news update. good morning, jacki. >> good morning, bill. good morning, everybody. the department of justice says it plans to sue the state of florida for refusing to stop purging state voter rolls in violation of -- there we go. sorry about that. so the secretary of state >> that does not put the president in the clear. we still have two jobs reports left before the election and in the latest cnn poll, likely voters are split on who would do a better job fixes thing. expect the president to say we already tried the bush era economic policies and that is what got us in this mess in the first place. the othe
friends page and see all these articles. he's to work for ronald reagan. is there a way -- are you doing anything to get into the race cycle with obama and romney? host: what do you say? guest: right now i'm excluded from the first debate. the commission is the presidential debate commission and that is private and made up of republicans and democrats with no interest in seeing a third voice on stage. we have filed three lawsuits to get me on stage based on other third-party candidates who have filed lawsuits. there doesn't seem to be much hope. we filed on the antitrust round, something that has not been done before. host: how much do these debates matter and what are you looking for to hearing on wednesday? guest: the debates are tantamount to me having a chance of winning. you can close the lid on winning the election. is winning getting enough votes to cause one of the other two who ends up winning to give more than just lip service to these issues? potentially. i view this as a victory every single day. there are so many people -- i think i speak on behalf of the majority of america
in the last 40 years to obtain that kind of support was ronald reagan within his own party. barack obama is more popular within the party and the base right now at this point in the election than bill clinton was, than jimmy carter was with his party and bush sr. was with his party. energy is hard to measure. the measurements we have show a reaganesque party unity. >> matt has this great piece in the rolling stone where he says the presidential race never, ever should have been this close. the idea that we become like sports announcers. we want the tight game going into the fourth quarter. we want a hail mary pass at the end because it is more exciting. he points out that, in fact, this race is one given both who mitt romney is as a candidate as well as the extremely high support that president obama has within his base should never have been this close at all which goes to your point about sometimes the massive amount of money that's gone into the race to give us a different message about mitt romney. >> i want to add one disagreement to the disagreement. as much as popularity and the f
, ronald reagan speech writer and adviser has long argued that there is no such thing as a bradley effect. the bradley effect is named for mayor tom bradley of los angeles when he ran against george deukmejian did not do as well in the final balloting is he had been doing in the polling. for years pundits have ascribe that to the brad the affected people are free to say they're not going to vote for african-american because they don't want to be up to the prejudice he they're talking anonymously to pollsters. and he has all the data, and i believe him, but i believe that even if the bradley effect was not true in 1982, latest here in 2012. there is a significant number of people, not for reasons related to race, but for reasons related to the nature of the democratic partisanship who are refusing to tell pollsters that they're not going to vote for president obama. there are quite frankly scared of the machine. and if you are a fan of chick-fil-a you know what i'm talking about. [applause] interestingly enough their is a potential vice presidential pick for each of these regions in each o
gone on to win after less-than-stellar first debate performances. ronald reagan in 1984, george w. bush in 2004. norah, charlie, gayle? >> bill plante, thank you. >>> also in denver, major garrett, national journalist white house correspondent. good morning. >> good morning. >> so, what does the romney campaign have to do now to take advantage of what everybody believes was a victory in the debate? >> well, charlie, there's a very simple answer to that, and two romney campaign officials told it to me before the debate started -- if this night works for us, our biggest challenge will be not dousing the flame we've set tonight, meaning they know that they've internally messed up advantages and advantageous moments mitt romney set for his campaign. so, they know now the most important thing between this debate and the next one is not to blow the momentum, to enhance it, blow on the fire and make it larger and not douse it. that's the biggest challenge the romney campaign faces. >> what's the challenge for the obama campaign? >> to bounce back. two very significant democrats i talked to las
that other presidents have gone on to win after less than stellar first debate performances. ronald reagan in 1984. george w. bush in 2004. norah, charlie, gayle. >> also in denver major garrett, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. >> what does the romney campaign have to do now to take advantage of what everybody believes was a victory in the debate? >> reporter: there's a very simple answer to that. two romney campaign officials told me. if this night works for us our biggest challenge is not dousing the flame we set tonight meaning they know they've internally messed up advantages and advantageous moments that romney separates his campaign. they know now the most important between this debate and the next one not to blow the momentum. to blow on that fire and make it larger and not douse it. >> what's the challenge for the obama campaign? >> reporter: to bounce back. two very significant democrats who i talked to last night looking at the debates said i would call the debate trading places. mitt romney's back was against the wall now the president's back is against the wall and he
as a candidate. it could be very defining. ronald reagan was particularly haying third. he didn't let on about the criticisms. he felt the carter campaign waged against him and the distortion and lies of the campaign and wanted to settle a score in the debate but he left it with their you go again. didn't get involved in the minutia or detailing each and every spike. just some it up in a comment like that. not saying this debate can survive 90 minutes on little things but expects some of that tonight. dennis: wall street has decided this election is over and obama has won. the debate starting tonight confirm that or is there a chance the debate could make the difference and shift the tide here? >> this is the same wall street that earlier in the year thought mitt romney had won. i might respect some of these guys stock-picking acumen but i have serious doubts about their political acumen. i will leave the calendar to decide how this is judged. any snapshot at any moment is just a snapshot in a moment. might seem simplistic but bears watching that we could go the president was up by 10 points i
, and that could have a provision that will lock up. this stuff really matters. and the communal, when ronald reagan wave to the big bill around in his state of the union in the ladies the democrats could not have pled that we did not have microsoft word. the continuing resolution was very fast, very big, very fast. there are others. it seems like when it really matters that is what we are least likely to get the time to read these. we really need to defend ourselves as a society. so all of these technical advances are good and creating 30-40 different variables, the real crucial thing, before we pass these huge loss, especially if it is in the middle of the night or whenever, what is the political failure here that we still can't do this? i would also note that it is doable. the affordable care act, obamacare, there was 72 hours. in fact, everybody in washington , was marveling. it was accepted. nobody argue with it. i met a lobbyist who was complaining. they could not because who is going to hang out for 72 hours. they could not get away with it. this can be done, even on use things like th
, on that measure, was way ahead. >> brett is the debate coach but ronald reagan's media adviser said when you're dealing with television, make no mistake, debates are television, it's 85, 10/5. 85% of what you say, and 5% how you look. do you agree with that? >> i do. he was directing his comments right at president obama. and the president kept looking down. the more the debate went on, the more he looked down. >> the spin started immediately, right, in the spin room right after the debate. >> during the debate. >> tweeting during the debate. jen psaki is the traveling press secretary for the obama campaign. >> good morning. >> good morning. we heard stephanie cutter, who was spinning, talking with jessica yellin last night. she said this. i want to play a little chunk of that. >> my plan is not to put in place any tax cut that will add to the deficit. that's point one. >> i'm just going to read it to you. sorry, jen. let me read it to you. stephanie said this when she came out to the spin room. she said, yes, mitt romney, he absolutely wins the preparation. he wins the style points. that's
think i talk toud about this the other day. mike deaver, the media adviser to ronald reagan, he once said these television events -- and make no mistake a debate is a television event -- 85% visual, 10% how you sound and 5% of what you actually say. leading up to the importance of, as you've been talking about, likability. i'm taken aback by how much more stiff president obama was than mitt romney. you played moments like that and throughout the debate, mitt romney seemed calm, in command of the facts, comfortable, made eye contact with the president. the president simply just looked uncomfortabl uncomfortable. >> and, roland, one of the boston papers had a headline that it was snore more years for obama. i mean, the reviews of his performance are harsh. >> absolutely. i think that it was lackluster, to some degree. i will disagree with will cain when he said mitt romney had a command of the facts. he had a command of what mitt thought actually were facts. you look at the fact checkers today. and so he's not doing well in that particular area. at the end of the day is what do the fol
. fact far land has been looking into this. former administrative assistant to president ronald reagan. they arrived at sun up, left at sundown, about 13 hours on the ground. they collected evidence for about three hours' time. what more do you have on that? >> this is a month later. there are so many problems with this it's hard to know where to start. there was an intelligence failure, why did we not know that there were attacks planned on the ambassador. there had been a number, a string of attacks leading up to this attack. an intelligence failure. two, a security failure. why? in the light of all the security warnings did they not provide the security? who made that decision? and that really is the third point, who made the decision, whose policy was it to not provide adequate security for a united states ambassador in united states territory. for that i think the blame game has started. bill: let me stop you there, because you worked in washington, you know how this works. whose responsibility is it to make a decision to protect the u.s. ambassador overseas? >> i was in the white
creation under ronald reagan, and that level of job creation under bill clinton. >> and a democratic president where the tax rates were higher. >> right, you had a republican congress, welfare reform. >> the highest rate was 39.6%. and the gdp was going up. >> look what happened to the size of the government. he was a very fiscally conservative president unlike barack obama where the budget went through the roof. i think that is a key distinction. >> the era of big government is over. listen to eric, and what he told me about mitt romney yesterday here in "the situation room." the governor believe that's those with continuous coverage should not be dropped if they change their plans and have a pre-existing condition. states are well situated to manage these issues. we did it in massachusetts, and they can do it in other states as well. >> mitt romney says he wants to make sure that people can get insurance even if they have pre-existing conditions, but if he gives the states the opportunity to come up with their own plans, there's no guarantee that will do that. >> this is a politica
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)